Great Neck Historical Society exploring North Shore’s role in aviation

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Nassau County Cradle of Aviation Museum Academic Coordinator Richard Angler will discuss “Long Island’s Significant Contributions to the Development of Aviation and Space Flight” at the next meeting of the Great Neck Historical Society next Monday, March 18, at 7:30 p.m. at Great Neck House. The program is free and open to the community.
Nassau County Cradle of Aviation Museum Academic Coordinator Richard Angler will discuss “Long Island’s Significant Contributions to the Development of Aviation and Space Flight” at the next meeting of the Great Neck Historical Society next Monday, March 18, at 7:30 p.m. at Great Neck House. The program is free and open to the community.

Long Island’s North Shore has played a significant role in the development of the nation’s aviation history, and the Great Neck Historical Society will explore the region’s involvement in its next program, free and open to the community next Monday, March 18.

Nassau County Cradle of Aviation Museum Academic Coordinator Richard Angler, who has played key education roles at the facility, will discuss “Long Island’s Significant Contributions to the Development of Aviation and Space Flight” at the discussion, which begins at 7:30 p.m. at Great Neck House.

“In less that 80 years aviation has grown, boomed, and declined on Long Island,” according to Joshua Stoff, curator of the Aviation Museum. “However, Long Island has helped transform aviation from a dangerous sport to a viable means of transportation. It has also produced a large portion of the nation’s aerial arsenal in time of war. The many record-setting and historic flights that transpired here, and the many aviation companies that developed here, made aviation the integral part of our world that is today.”

Although there are currently no aircraft being built entirely on Long Island today, there are more than 240 companies producing a wide variety of parts for virtually every American aircraft.

Angler was the lead educator and point-of-contact with NASA for their “Teaching From Space” program, which allowed students to speak with international space station crewmembers. He also contributed to NASA’s “Museum In a Box” program by developing lessons with aeronautics themes. He had previously worked as an educator in the Rockville Centre public schools.

Following his talk, Angler will answer audience questions. For further information about the program and other Historical Society activities, visit www.GreatNeckHistorical.org or call (516) 288-6124.

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