Great South Bay Brewery going green with rebranding

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Great South Bay Brewery announced a major rebranding to reflect the company’s commitment to reduce their carbon footprint and establish a simple, consistent, can design.

After 10 years of operation, GSB has decided to take their packaging in a different direction without making any changes to the award-winning beer or sacrificing dedication to the craft. Moving away from their classic images and graphics, the company decided to break things down and use a more simple, sleek design while sticking true to their history and brand.

“With all the crazy artwork and busy designs in the brewing industry, we decided to go in a different direction with our rebrand,” said Ryan Randazzo, special projects manager for GSB. “The refined look is easy to spot, and the uniform design makes it distinguishable on the shelf. By putting the beer style in big letters under the beer name we hope consumers will find it easier to effortlessly find the beer that’s right for them, and maybe try something new.”

While GSB may be moving away from their classic, beach-themed designs, the company continues to hold true to their roots with nautical flag designs spread across each can, and individual logos for each beer style under their names. The company wants to shift the perception from a summer beer to a year-round brewery that takes the craft seriously. The new can design began its distribution on Aug. 14.

To be more environmentally conscious with the rebrand, GSB has decided to stop bottling their beer and focus exclusively on cans and kegs. While kegs are ideal for lowering the carbon footprint in the brewing industry, the decision to eliminate bottles was an easy one for the growing brand.

“The problem with glass is it’s heavy,” said Zach Popp, sales representative at GSB. “Between the thick cardboard packaging used to make sure bottles don’t break and the larger carbon footprint it leaves when it comes to transportation, we decided to eliminate bottles entirely in an effort to go green.”

Transporting bottles emits 20 percent more greenhouse gasses than that of a can, which drastically adds up over time (Meenan). It doesn’t stop there. Cans are typically made with 70 percent recycled content, as opposed to 20 to 30 percent for bottles, and people are 20 percent more likely to recycle cans than glass.

The rebranding includes top-to-bottom redesign of the company’s logo, graphics, and packaging design for the first time in the brand’s history. Great South Bay has a history of award-winning beer with more than a dozen medals in beer festivals and contests across the country, and the new design will reach a larger public audience while making strides to protect the planet.

Submitted by Great South Bay Brewery.

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