Area schools could see $10.3M increase in state aid

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Area school districts will see an increase in state aid, but much of it is in the form of building and building reorganization aid. (Data from New York State Division of the Budget)
Area school districts will see an increase in state aid, but much of it is in the form of building and building reorganization aid. (Data from New York State Division of the Budget)

Area school districts could see a $10.39 million increase in state aid, according to Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s 2019-20 budget proposal, with aid rising from $101.71 million to $112.1 million.

Overall, the total aid to area districts would increase 10.22 percent. An injection of building and reorganization aid drives most of that increase, with foundation aid staying largely the same in area school districts.

Sewanhaka Central High School District, home to more than 8,000 students, with a third of them considered “economically disadvantaged” by the state, would see the largest overall increase under the proposal, going from $36.83 million to $41.9 million.

Building aid drives most of this increase, as it would rise $3 million from $2.08 million to $5.47 million under the proposal. Foundation aid would go up slightly from $25.32 million to $25.44 million. Without the building aid, the increase is $1.67 million, or 4.82 percent, according to the state.

Superintendent Ralph Ferrie declined to comment at a Tuesday night board meeting on the proposal.

In terms of percentages, Roslyn would see the largest increase. Its total state aid would rise from $5.89 million to $7.26 million – or 23.18 percent – if building aid is included. Building and building reorganization incentives would rise from $434,739 to $1.29 million while transportation aid would go from $591,767 to $827,404.

Without the building incentives, Roslyn’s increase is more than halved to 10.34 percent – or $559,713.

Port Washington Union Free School District’s aid would go up 17.43 percent from $9.66 million to $11.35 million, or $1.36 million, according to the state.

State assistance for special services would go up from $71,832 to $454,330 and transportation aid would increase from $806,021 to $1.05 million, while building and building reorganization incentives would go up nearly $1 million from $965,181 to $1.91 million.

Without incorporating building and reorganization aid, the increase would be $740,019, or 8.5 percent, according to the state.

Great Neck’s total state aid would be $10.35 million under the governor’s proposal, up $608,574, or 6.24 percent, from $9.75 million. Without building or reorganization aid, which would rise from $138,565 to $448,340, the difference would be more than halved to $298,799, or 3.11 percent.

State aid for Herricks would go up $604,262, or 4.92 percent, from $12.27 million to $12.87 million under the proposal. BOCES assistance would go up from $1.12 million to $1.32 million, while transportation aid would increase from $1.05 million to $1.24 million.

Without factoring in building aid, that increase would be 5.12 percent.

Manhasset’s total aid would go up $215,175, or 4.54 percent, from $4.73 million to $4.95 million. Building aid is slated to go up from $240,386 to $342,443, while BOCES aid would go up from $506,011 to $634,654.

Without building aid factored in, the overall increase in aid is 2.51 percent, or $113,118.

The New Hyde Park-Garden City Park district would see the smallest overall increase among area schools, with aid rising only $23,389, or 0.37 percent, to $6.29 million from $6.26 million when factoring in building aid.

When not factoring in building aid, the difference is $148,230, or 2.78 percent, according to state data. Building aid is slated to be $815,378, more than $100,000 less than the $940,219 in the current budget.

The district will see transportation aid increase from $270,042 to $338,516 and assistance to offset high costs would increase from $189,940 to $243,023.

East Williston’s state aid would go up $273,090 from $3.69 million to $3.96 million, according to the proposal, or 7.39 percent. Without factoring in building aid, that increase is $215,057, or 6.37 percent.

Transportation aid would increase from $455,371 to $608,057, building aid would go up from $320,026 to $378,059, and BOCES assistance would be $776,846, up from the current $732,680.

“We are, of course, appreciative of any aid we receive from New York State in support of our East Williston School District,” East Williston Superintendent Elaine Kanas said via email. “99.75% of this increase represents expense based aid corresponding directly to BOCES, transportation, and capital improvements.”

State assistance for Mineola would go up 4.89 percent, or $363,453, from $7.43 million to $7.79 million. Without factoring in state building aid, that increase is $255,369, or 3.73 percent.

The increases are concentrated in BOCES, which would go up from $1.05 million to $1.13 million, transportation aid, which would go up from $518,733 to $691,822, and building and building reorganization aid, which could go from $593,556 to $701,640.

Floral Park-Bellerose schools would see aid rise $185,087, or 3.59 percent, from $5.15 million to $5.33 million. When not factoring in building and building reorganization aid, that number drops to $54,517, or 1.19 percent.

Building and building reorganization aid would go up from $581,755 to $712,325, while aid to deal with high or excess cost would go up from $130,928 to $219,431.

In Nassau County, aid would increase from $1.13 billion to $1.18 billion, a total of roughly $46.04 million. Without building and reorganization building aid, that number is $27.4 million.

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